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USDA Drops Plans to Trace Livestock

Posted by Jane Akre
Monday, February 08, 2010 11:41 AM EST
Category: Protecting Your Family
Tags: Communicable Diseae, Food Safety, E. Coli, Mad Cow Disease, Cattle Industry

the USDA will work with the cattle industry to work on a tracing program after push back from the industry to regulations.

Tracing Communicable Disease

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IMAGE SOURCE: Beef cattle Wikimedia Commons Web site, author John Comloquoy

In a major compromise to the livestock industry, the Obama administration plans to start over in developing a way to trace communicable disease in livestock after resistance from ranchers and farmers.

In doing so, it is abandoning the National Animal Identification System, developed by the Bush administration in 2004 after identification of mad cow disease in 2003.

Participation was voluntary and ranchers objected to the extra work and cost in identifying cattle.

As it now stands, states will have to devise systems to identify livestock. New federal rules, when they are developed in as long as two years, will only apply to livestock being moved interstate, such as livestock transported to a slaughter house in another state.

The National Animal Identification System (NAIS) was intended to give health officials the ability to trace every pig, chicken or cow with a unique identification number that would be entered into a database. If there was a disease outbreak such as mad cow disease or E.coli, agricultural officials would be able to locate the sick animal and others who had been exposed to the sick animal.

The old system received $142 million in federal funds, but ultimately only 40% of the livestock producers participated. Tom Vilsack, the head of the Department of Agriculture was bombarded with opposition to the NAIS. Opponents such as the American Farm Bureau Federation opposed the identification system.

It was just overwhelming in the country that people didn’t like it, and I think they took that feedback to heart,” said Mary Kay Thatcher, public policy director to the New York Times.

Carol Tucker Foreman, with the Consumer Federation of America agrees that managing the old system state-by-state was not working.

“Today’s announcement by the U.S. Department of Agriculture that it will develop a new framework for animal identification and traceability is a welcome break from previous attempts to develop a National Animal Identification System,” said Foreman in a statement.

The Obama administration plans on working in consultation with the livestock industry and state in developing a new system. #


4 Comments

Posted by Josef Hlasny
Monday, February 08, 2010 5:11 PM EST

The Bush administration proposed the federally run ID system after the discovery of the nation's first case of mad cow disease (BSE) in 2003; that can (according to the infectious theory) afflict humans. USDA had spent more than $130 million without coming up with a workable system...However, BSE can be a naturally occurring disease, so not an infectious disease. WHY? Because, about the BSE disease; this was never justified scientifically! It was pure, math-model-driven science fiction. But it was pushed very vigorously by the British science establishment, which has never confessed to its errors, and is therefore likely to make the same ones again.
Indeed, really! See recently; the swine flu outbreak was a 'false pandemic'; said Wolfgang Wodarg, head of health at the Council of Europe (January 8, 2010). He has branded the H1N1 outbreak as 'one of the greatest medical scandals of the century'!
However, the pandemic has started on May 1, 2009 when Roy Anderson was interviewed on the BBC's Today programme about the 2009 swine flu outbreak. He was a member of a group set up to give scientific advice to the British government over health issues relating to swine flu. However, swine flu is not the first time we have suffered this nonsense. See predictions about BSE/ vCJD by Roy M. Anderson. He has mathematically modelled the spread of new variant Creutzfeld- Jakob disease (v CJD), published in Nature (406, 583-584; 10 August 2000).
There his team showed that the current mortality data are consistent with between 63 and 136,000 cases among the population known to have a susceptible genotype (about 40% of the total population), with on average less than two cases of vCJD arising from the consumption of one infected bovine. However, far fewer people are carrying the human form of mad cow disease than previously feared. There have been (to date) 168 definite or probable cases of vCJD since 1995, suggesting that the risk had been "overestimated".
This led to an obscene GBP 5 billion campaign of British cattle destruction and compensation. And about the USA ? The International Trade Commission released a report estimating that trade restrictions resulting from BSE cost the cattle industry $11 billion from 2004 to 2007
( LINK ). This could be "more greatest medical scandal"!
See other relationships, according to my web www.bse-expert.cz and recent presentation at 29th World Veterinary Congress in Vancouver; Neurodegenerative Diseases and Schizophrenia as a Hyper or Hypofunction of the NMDA Receptors (www.bse-expert.cz/pdf/Veter_kongres.pdf) and my recent comments (( LINK ) about the; BSE/ vCJD mathematical- models.

Posted by Josef Hlasny
Monday, February 08, 2010 5:11 PM EST

The Bush administration proposed the federally run ID system after the discovery of the nation's first case of mad cow disease (BSE) in 2003; that can (according to the infectious theory) afflict humans. USDA had spent more than $130 million without coming up with a workable system...However, BSE can be a naturally occurring disease, so not an infectious disease. WHY? Because, about the BSE disease; this was never justified scientifically! It was pure, math-model-driven science fiction. But it was pushed very vigorously by the British science establishment, which has never confessed to its errors, and is therefore likely to make the same ones again.
Indeed, really! See recently; the swine flu outbreak was a 'false pandemic'; said Wolfgang Wodarg, head of health at the Council of Europe (January 8, 2010). He has branded the H1N1 outbreak as 'one of the greatest medical scandals of the century'!
However, the pandemic has started on May 1, 2009 when Roy Anderson was interviewed on the BBC's Today programme about the 2009 swine flu outbreak. He was a member of a group set up to give scientific advice to the British government over health issues relating to swine flu. However, swine flu is not the first time we have suffered this nonsense. See predictions about BSE/ vCJD by Roy M. Anderson. He has mathematically modelled the spread of new variant Creutzfeld- Jakob disease (v CJD), published in Nature (406, 583-584; 10 August 2000).
There his team showed that the current mortality data are consistent with between 63 and 136,000 cases among the population known to have a susceptible genotype (about 40% of the total population), with on average less than two cases of vCJD arising from the consumption of one infected bovine. However, far fewer people are carrying the human form of mad cow disease than previously feared. There have been (to date) 168 definite or probable cases of vCJD since 1995, suggesting that the risk had been "overestimated".
This led to an obscene GBP 5 billion campaign of British cattle destruction and compensation. And about the USA ? The International Trade Commission released a report estimating that trade restrictions resulting from BSE cost the cattle industry $11 billion from 2004 to 2007
( LINK ). This could be "more greatest medical scandal"!
See other relationships, according to my web www.bse-expert.cz and recent presentation at 29th World Veterinary Congress in Vancouver; Neurodegenerative Diseases and Schizophrenia as a Hyper or Hypofunction of the NMDA Receptors (www.bse-expert.cz/pdf/Veter_kongres.pdf) and my recent comments (( LINK ) about the; BSE/ vCJD mathematical- models.

Posted by Josef Hlasny
Monday, February 08, 2010 6:17 PM EST

The Bush administration proposed the federally run ID system after the discovery of the nation's first case of mad cow disease (BSE) in 2003; that can (according to the infectious theory) afflict humans.This old system received $142 million in federal funds, but ultimately only 40% of the livestock producers participated...
However, BSE can be a naturally occurring disease, so not an infectious disease. WHY? The supporting evidence was related to four papers published in high-ranking journals ( 1996- 1999). See the last paper- as abstract (Scott et al, 1999); the team led by professor Prusiner;
Scott MR, Will R, Ironside J, Nguyen HO, Tremblay P, DeArmond SJ, Prusiner SB..: Compelling transgenetic evidence for transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy prions to humans. Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.USA, 96, 1999; 15137- 15142;
There is growing concern that bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) may have passed from cattle to humans. We report here that transgenic (Tg) mice expressing bovine (Bo) prion protein (PrP) serially propagate BSE prions and that there is no species barrier for transmission from cattle to Tg(BoPrP) mice. These same mice were also highly susceptible to a new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (nvCJD) and natural sheep scrapie. The incubation times (approximately 250 days), neuropathology, and disease-causing PrP isoforms in Tg(BoPrP)Prnp(0/0) mice inoculated with nvCJD and BSE brain extracts were indistinguishable and differed dramatically from those seen in these mice injected with natural scrapie prions. Our findings provide the most compelling evidence to date that prions from cattle with BSE have infected humans and caused fatal neurodegeneration.
Unfortunately their „BSE infectious conclusion“ was worldwide accepted (to date). However, these „infectious conclusions“ were two years later diminished- rejected by professor D.R. Brown and published in Medical Hypotheses ( (2001; 57, 555-560); „BSE did not cause variant CJD:an alternative cause related to post-industrial environmental contamination“. See more about professor David R. BROWN, Bath University; he is an excellent scientist about „Prion Protein and other Proteins associated with Neurodegeneration“ ( LINK ).
There are some his views- results from Medical Hypotheses (Brown, D.R., 2001); The new prion diseases that have emerged in the last 15 years are bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). Although initially confined to the UK, these diseases have recently emerged in other European countries. The accepted cause of the human disease is that BSE spread from cattle to humans by the consumption of infected beef. However, the evidence that supports this is very thin. In terms of the virtually Europe-wide threat of BSE, which can no longer be proven to be related to imports of UK cattle, it is almost impossible to prove that BSE is related to `infection'. The widespread nature of BSE now suggests that it should be considered a sporadic disease, like scrapie. There is no evidence that a piece of meet cut from a BSE-infected cow contains PrPSc. When such a critical piece of evidence is missing from the picture one is left to wonder why no other explanation other than BSE as the cause of variant CJD is considered. Perhaps variant CJD was caused by BSE, but if there is another cause and all endeavours to investigate any are discredited as being illogical or ridiculous, then no advance to prevent or treat the variant CJD will be achieved beyond the serendipitous result of trial and error. Scientific method, as opposed to political bluster, suggests that theory should be tested by refutation. A credible theory can only be supported when the evidence opposing the theory is compared to that supporting it and the supporting evidence found to be greater and more credible that the refuting evidence. Therefore, the logical way to test the validity of the theory that BSE caused CJD is to investigate if there is evidence for an alternative explanation.
The temporal relationship between BSE and variant CJD only coincidentally supports the notion that BSE caused variant CJD, and as such is not strong evidence. The evidence other than this comes from research using mouse models and analysis of subtypes of abnormal prion protein. This supporting evidence is related to four papers published in high-ranking journals ( (COLLINGE et al., 1996; HILL et al., 1997; BRUCE et al., 1997;; SCOTT et al., 1999;)- concluded professor D.R. Brown (2001).
It is interesting that professor Prusiner (Nobel Prize 1997), only one participated in the four "mouse prion research" (1999) and never in the „mathematical modeling“ of transmission of BSE to humans. Yet his finding of infectious transmission of BSE remain valid today.

Anonymous User
Posted by Barbara
Tuesday, February 09, 2010 7:25 AM EST

American Farm Bureau is lying if they are now claiming to have opposed NAIS. Read the article at this link:
LINK

Comments for this article are closed.

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