Welcome! We regret to inform you that the Injury Board National News Desk has been discontinued. Feel free to browse around and enjoy our previously published articles, or visit The Injury Blog Network for the latest in personal injury news.

Heart Disease Kills More Women Than Next Five Causes of Death

Posted by Jane Akre
Thursday, January 31, 2008 10:30 AM EST
Category: On The Road, Major Medical, Protecting Your Family, In The Workplace
Tags: None

Friday is Heart Health day for women.

LEARN MORE

Friday, February 1 is National Wear Red Day and thousands of organizations, companies, cities and women across the country will be wearing red that day to encourage women to take care of themselves and their heart health.

Go Red For Women is the American Heart Association’s nationwide movement to fight heart disease in women. Raising awareness is the first step. 

Did you know that heart disease kills more women than the next five causes of death combined?

An American Heart Association study of more than 1,000 women reveals that only 12 percent of women believe heart disease and stroke are the greatest health threats to women.

Heart disease is generally thought to be a man’s disease but nearly twice as many women in the U.S. die of heart disease and stroke than from all forms of cancer. Cardiovascular disease kills more than 460,000 people every year.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an umbrella term that includes a broad range of diseases that affect your heart including coronary artery disease, heart attack, heart failure, high blood pressure and stroke.  Heart disease and cardiovascular disease often mean the same thing – disease of the heart and blood vessels.

In 2004 the Go Red For Women campaign was created. Going Red means you passionately support the movement to improve women’s’ heart health and save lives. Knowledge is the first step. Know the risks, how to prevent heart disease.

Marie Osmond is the spokesperson who is calling on real comen across America to share their heart health stories. Marie says she lost her mother, father and grandfather to heart disease. She says that sharing stories will make it easier to encourage lifestyle changes that strengthen our hearts and our families. 

The women who participate can also possibly represent the movement in its upcoming 2008 and 2009 campaign which includes a TV special on women and heart disease.  

Besides wearing red on Friday, you are encouraged to shop for Go Red Products which includes gift cards ( red of course) perfume, teddy bears etc.  and the movement includes a 12 week physical activity story and the Choose To Move “Countdown” which includes a downloadable desktop course that keeps you on track and keeps you motivated during the 12 weeks.

Stories on how to beat genetic high cholesterol. Melanie, Tim, Jayne, Shana and Patricia share their stories, advice, opinions, and words of encouragement about how they’ve made lifestyle changes to keep their heart healthy.

Some things you need to know include :  

Warning signs of heart disease

  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain and discomfort
  • Nausea, vomiting and back of jaw pain

Heart attacks can involve discomfort in the center of the chest that can be intense or go away and come back. It can feel like pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain. Your arms, back, neck, jaw or stomach discomfort can signal a heart attack as can a cold sweat or shortness of breath.

Risk factors that can be addressed by lifestyle changes

  • High Blood Cholesterol
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Tobacco smoke
  • Physical inactivity
  • Obesity or overweight
  • Diabetes
  • Total Cholesterol: Less than 200 mg/dL
  • LDL (bad) Cholesterol: LDL cholesterol goals vary
  • For people who don’t have heart disease and one or no risk factors, the goal isless than 160 mg/dL.
  • For most people with two or more risk factors, the goal is less than 130 mg/dL.
  • For people who have heart disease, or diabetes, the goal is to keep the LDL below 100 mg/dL.
  • HDL (good) Cholesterol: 50 mg/dL or higher
  • Triglycerides: Less than 150 mg/dL
  • Blood Pressure: Less than 120/80 mmHg
  • Fasting Glucose: Less than 100 mg/dL
  • Body Mass Index (BMI): Less than 25 Kg/m²
  • Waist circumference: Less than 35 inches
  • Exercise: A minimum of 30 minutes most days, if not all days of the week.
  • Eat a balanced diet emphasizing a variety of fruits, vegetables, grains, low-fat or non-fat dairy products, fish, legumes and sources of protein low in saturated fat (e.g., poultry, lean meats and plant sources).
  • Don’t smoke – if you smoke, stop 

What You Can Do  

  • Keep Total Cholesterol: Less than 200 mg/dL
  • LDL (bad) Cholesterol: LDL cholesterol goals vary
  • For people who don’t have heart disease and one or no risk factors, the goal isless than 160 mg/dL.
  • For most people with two or more risk factors, the goal is less than 130 mg/dL.
  • For people who have heart disease, or diabetes, the goal is to keep the LDL below 100 mg/dL.
  • HDL (good) Cholesterol: 50 mg/dL or higher
  • Triglycerides: Less than 150 mg/dL
  • Blood Pressure: Less than 120/80 mmHg
  • Fasting Glucose: Less than 100 mg/dL
  • Body Mass Index (BMI): Less than 25 Kg/m²
  • Waist circumference: Less than 35 inches
  • Exercise: A minimum of 30 minutes most days, if not all days of the week.
  • Eat a balanced diet emphasizing a variety of fruits, vegetables, grains, low-fat or non-fat dairy products, fish, legumes and sources of protein low in saturated fat (e.g., poultry, lean meats and plant sources).
  • Don’t smoke – if you smoke, stop 

Schedule regular visits with your doctor

  • Visit your healthcare provider to learn how to make heart-healthy habits part of your daily life. Follow up by scheduling a doctor’s appointment each year.
  • Know your numbers. Track your blood pressure, cholesterol, glucose and weight and keep them in a healthy range.
  • Determine your risk for heart disease by taking the Go Red Heart CheckUp at www.GoRedForWomen.org.
  • Incorporate physical activity into your daily routine with Choose To Move, a 12-week physical activity and nutrition program that can be customized to fit your lifestyle. Register at www.goredforwomen.org.
  • Add more color to your plate by eating more fruits and vegetables daily. Find cooking tips and flavorful recipes that are good for your heart in the Go Red “Love
    Your Heart” 5th anniversary cookbook. #

 

 


5 Comments

Anonymous User
Posted by paige
Thursday, January 31, 2008 12:59 PM EST

what up dis paige and you look like you is cool i will love to meet you one day i hope you ok and my sisthe kelsey saidd whats up

Anonymous User
Posted by Val Tardie
Friday, February 01, 2008 12:31 PM EST

I so need to get very involved on this subject matter since I lost both my Mom & Dad from this disease. So i already know this disease will affect me since i am already 53 yrs young. I very much hate physical activity except walking, walk my dog alot. but i do love veggies & salads. any info you can email me is appreciated. thk you val

Anonymous User
Posted by exxie
Saturday, February 02, 2008 8:26 PM EST

Using Marie Osmond as a spokesperson makes me uninterested and unwilling to read the article. Try using someone more appealling, read likeable when discussing something important.

Anonymous User
Posted by Jane Akre
Monday, February 04, 2008 2:35 PM EST

Hi Exxie-We didn't choose Marie Osmond, but the American Heart Association did! Thanks for viewing.
BTW- She's had heart disease in her family, that's why she is a spokesperson.

Posted by Dawn™
Thursday, February 14, 2008 4:12 PM EST

Thank you for your informative page on women's heart disease. I'm doing a search for "women's heart disease awareness" comments, graphics, and links to post to my myspace page. Anything you can direct me to would be appreciated.

Thank you,
Dawn™

P.S. I think Marie Osmond is a beautiful 'spokesperson' and I'm glad to see her picture on this page.

Comments for this article are closed.

About the National News Desk

Our mission is to seek the complete truth and provide a full and fair account of the events and issues that surround personal safety, accident prevention, and injury recovery.  We are committed to serving the public with honesty and integrity in these efforts.

Hurt in an accident? Contact an Injury Board member

Subscribe to Blog Updates

Enter your email address if you would like to receive email notifications when comments are made on this post.

Email address

Subscribe

RSS Feed

Add the National News Desk to your favorite RSS reader

Add to Google Reader Add to myYahoo Add to myMSN Add to Bloglines Add to Newsgator Add to Netvibes Add to Pageflakes