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All news posts from May 01, 2001 to May 31, 2001

Posted by Staff Writer
May 31, 2001 12:00 AM

Venezuela's consumer protection agency has requested that the Venezuelan attorney general ban the sale of Ford Explorers in that country. The Venezuelan agency blames the for 37 deaths in 50 serious accidents since August 2000. The president of Ford criticized the request, claiming that the Venezuelan agency's inv

Posted by Staff Writer
May 31, 2001 12:00 AM

Police officers working the beat in Tampa's popular Ybor City entertainment district are concerned about the effect that loud music wafting out of the district's numerous bars may have on their hearing. From Thursday through Saturday nights, Tampa's finest patrol the hotspot keeping the peace. In addition, many offic

Posted by Staff Writer
May 28, 2001 12:00 AM

Three members of the House of Representatives introduced the "Breast Cancer and Environmental Research Act" earlier this month. If passed, the Act would establish and fund centers around the country conducting research on the connection between breast cancer and environmental contamination.

Posted by Staff Writer
May 28, 2001 12:00 AM

Scientists have recently found a link between environmental factors and the development of Parkinson's disease. Generally, genetics and heredity play a role in the development of Parkinson's at a young age, but as the age of the individual increases, these factors tend to play less of a role. At a recent meeting

Posted by Staff Writer
May 28, 2001 12:00 AM

International Business Machines Corp. (IBM) settled with two former employees who claimed that toxic fumes they breathed in the semiconductor factory where they worked were to blame for their son's birth defects. Terms of the settlement weren't disclosed. Zachary Ruffing, now 15 years old, was born blind and wit

Posted by Staff Writer
May 28, 2001 12:00 AM

A recent study conducted by the National and State Public Interest Research Group found that consumers may be buying fertilizers made of toxic waste. Fertilizer manufacturers buy toxic waste from industrial companies to get minerals like zinc and iron at low cost. These minerals are then used to make the fertilizer sol

Posted by Staff Writer
May 28, 2001 12:00 AM

The United Nations (UN) announced recently that over 500,000 tons of deteriorating pesticides in countries around the world must be cleaned up immediately in order to avoid serious environmental and health problems. As the substances age and deteriorate, they may release chemicals that are even more toxic than the orig

Posted by Staff Writer
May 28, 2001 12:00 AM

The parents of Katherine and Elizabeth Jackson received great news from a Hillsborough County civil jury when they were awarded $10.6 million in the case involving the death of one of their daughters and permanent injury of another. In 1997, Debra Jackson was turning into the Hunter's Green subdivision when a drunk dr

Posted by Staff Writer
May 28, 2001 12:00 AM

Several deaths of children in Pennsylvania have drawn attention to the issue of safety on farms. In March 2001, a three-year old boy was run over by a front-end loader being driven by his father. Anticipated charges against his father for the incident include child endangerment, reckless endangerment and reckless dri

Posted by Staff Writer
May 28, 2001 12:00 AM

A Disney spokesperson announced that there was no risk to Walt Disney World visitors stemming from a costume-wearing employee diagnosed with active Tuberculosis. The spokesperson also announced that Disney would not conduct TB tests on any of the visitors to the park. The Orange County Health Department confirmed

Posted by Staff Writer
May 28, 2001 12:00 AM

On February 6, 1997, Katherine and Elizabeth Jackson were hit by a drunk driver in the Hunter's Green subdivision located in Hillsborough County, Florida. Katherine was killed and her sister suffered serious brain damage, leaving her permanently disabled. The parents of Katherine and Elizabeth, Debra and Tom Jackson,

Posted by Staff Writer
May 28, 2001 12:00 AM

Seven people died from smoke inhalation in a fire that destroyed an old Philadelphia building apparently being used as a group home by several people. The majority of the residents at the home were mentally or physically disabled. The owner of the property was previously denied a license to run the care facility. In

Posted by Staff Writer
May 28, 2001 12:00 AM

A study in Germany recently found a link between increasing air pollution levels and high blood pressure. It is not clear how pollution affects blood pressure but it is suspected that pollution impacts the central nervous system, which controls blood pressure. Also, the pollutants may impact humidity and barometric pr

Posted by Staff Writer
May 28, 2001 12:00 AM

Officials in Martin County, Florida are demanding that incinerator ash sitting on a barge in the St. Lucie River be removed. Officials fear that a heavy downpour may force some of the ash off the barge and into the river. Tests conducted by several government agencies established that the ash is not hazardous, but the

Posted by Staff Writer
May 28, 2001 12:00 AM

Federal and State environmental agencies are suing a phosphate company whose spill of highly acidic water into the Alafia River in 1997 killed most of the river's aquatic life. The company has not yet established a cleanup plan. An accident at the Mulberry Phosphate plant sent about 50 million gallons of acidic water i

Posted by Staff Writer
May 28, 2001 12:00 AM

A recent study conducted at the University of Maryland found a relationship between exposure of expectant mothers to rodent poisons and herbicides and a certain birth defect affecting the development of infants' hearts. The birth defect caused by this exposure is the transposition of the great arteries(TGA). Tr

Posted by Staff Writer
May 28, 2001 12:00 AM

In the aftermath of Hurricane Mitch in 1998, the Centers for Disease Control tested the pesticide levels in the urine of teenagers in Honduras, a country hit hard by the storm. Alarmingly high levels of pesticides were found. The results were even more surprising because the pesticides at issue have been banned in the

Posted by Staff Writer
May 28, 2001 12:00 AM

The Environmental Protection Agency announced recently that pollution from industrial facilities increased 5% in 1999. Approximately 7.8 billion pounds of toxic chemicals were released into the air, water and land of the United States that year.

Posted by Staff Writer
May 27, 2001 12:00 AM

When an African-American woman traveling in Placentia, California was stopped by police during the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend, she was outraged when she read the ticket and discover that the letter 'N' was used as the racial designator. According to California police officers, the letter 'N' is the old law

Posted by Staff Writer
May 27, 2001 12:00 AM

The United States Supreme Court dismissed a lawsuit instituted by former inmate Tommy Randell seeking compensation for eight months he served in addition to his actual prison sentence. Randell claims that prison authorities did not give him credit for serving eight months in jail on a drunk driving charge. In prev

Posted by Staff Writer
May 27, 2001 12:00 AM

A former Los Angeles Police Department officer pled guilty to Federal charges including civil rights violations, obstructing justice, perjury, filing a false report and grand theft. The police officer, Nino Durden, admitted to shooting an unarmed gang member, planting a gun on him and then lying in court to convict hi

Posted by Staff Writer
May 27, 2001 12:00 AM

Despite the fact that a jury has already found the jailers of 33-year-old Philippe Le Menn not guilty in the French national's death, the family of Le Menn is still hopeful that further investigation by the FBI will prove the Las Vegas jail responsible for his death. The family of Le Menn hopes the FBI investigation w

Posted by Staff Writer
May 27, 2001 12:00 AM

Posted by Staff Writer
May 27, 2001 12:00 AM

On January 6, at 6:45 a.m., Christopher Croley was approached by a man wearing a hooded jacket and black gloves. The man had the hood pulled so tightly that his face was barely visible. When the man told Croley that he would shoot him dead if he did not give him what he wanted, Croley began to run and jumped in his c

Posted by Staff Writer
May 26, 2001 12:00 AM

A report issued recently in the Archives of Neurology claims that mild episodes of memory loss that were once thought to be a normal part of aging may in fact be the first signs of Alzheimer's. The journal cited a report in which researchers found that such memory loss usually progresses into full blown Alzheimer's.

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

While the nursing home industry blames lawyers for the rising cost of liability insurance, advocates for the elderly, the insurance industry and independent researchers argue that the volume of lawsuits against nursing homes indicates otherwise. Between 1993 and 1999, the percentage of homes caught violating Florida's

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

A Chicago judge has determined that five families, all touched in some manner by gun violence, will be allowed to proceed in their lawsuit against gun manufacturers. The victims sued the gun makers for allegedly "flooding" the streets of Chicago with an excessive amount of dangerous guns. To date, nearly 20 suits hav

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

A Rhode Island Wal-Mart store has agreed to move its gun display away from the toy section after protests from local residents. The state legislature even got involved with members proposing a bill to require strict regulation of gun displays in sporting good stores. Wal-Mart officials denied that the Rhode Island

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

A recent study shows that most employees who suffer from work-related injuries or illnesses are worried about their financial situation and job security. One source of this fear is the limited information employees have regarding their employer's disability procedures. The study suggests that employers communicate wi

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

The April issue of The Journal of Applied Psychology reports that employees who feel in control of their jobs and responsibilities are less likely than their less confident counterparts to develop cold and flu symptoms. Employees who are uncertain about their own capabilities suffer more stress which in turn may reduc

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

Because of exposure to different pesticides, chemicals, cleaning solutions and fumes, among other things, people in certain lines of work are more at risk of developing brain cancer. Men who work in plumbing; heating and air conditioning; roofing and siding; newspapers; rubber and plastic manufacturing; construction s

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

The Wisconsin Supreme Court upheld a ruling by the Wisconsin Industry Review Commission that an employee who passed out in the cold while drunk on a business trip is entitled to Worker's Compensation. The Commission ruled that the employee was on the trip for business purposes. However, because he was injured while in

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

A recent Texas Supreme Court ruling allows employers without workers' compensation insurance to give an employee company-paid benefits in exchange for the employee waiving the right to sue for an injury sustained on the job. The court interpreted the Texas Workers' Compensation Act as not specifically prohibiting this

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

For years, doctors and nurses have recommended the BRAT diet for children who are suffering from diarrhea. They are now changing their tune and have concluded that the diet can actually be more harmful than beneficial. The BRAT diet's name stands for the first initial of its ingredients--bananas, rice, applesauce or

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

An Ohio grand jury indicted two defendants for the deaths of several nursing home residents mistakenly given nitrogen instead of oxygen. The county prosecutor indicated that the indictments involved charges of involuntary manslaughter and reckless homicide but refused to reveal if the defendants were corporations or in

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

Lawmakers in four states have recently introduced bills that would allow nursing home residents to place surveillance cameras in their rooms. Industry critics have spearheaded the campaign to get surveillance cameras into residents' rooms in hopes of preventing the abuse we so often hear about. Nursing homes are resi

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

The Justice Department denied a request for death benefits made by a Utah inmate's family. Inmate Michael Todd Bishop, 27, died August 23, 2000 after being struck by lightning while fighting a wildfire. He was participating in the Flame-N-Go program sponsored by the Utah State Prison. The program trains inmates to b

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

A grand jury's four-month investigation into allegations of inmate abuse closed recently without handing down any indictments. The investigation focused on the claim of one inmate that a group of sheriff's deputies used excessive force against him. The investigation centered on inmate Leonel Vega's claim that deput

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

Authorities are looking for a red Ford Probe with dealer plates in the alleged road rage shooting of a 25 year-old construction worker and father on I-75 in Chicago. Elicio Hernandez, Jr. was driving on the highway and may have cutoff the driver of the Ford Probe. The Probe then pulled next to Hernandez's car and shot

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

A Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene study on violence and pregnant women found that homicide is the leading cause of death in pregnant women, accounting for 20% of such deaths. Homicide accounts for 6% of deaths of non-pregnant women. The study concluded that this could be due to an increase in domestic

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

Senators Joseph Lieberman, D-Conn., Hillary Rodham-Clinton, D-NY, and Herb Kohl, D-Wis., introduced the "Media Marketing Accountability Act" to the Senate in April. If passed, the bill will give the Federal Trade Commission the power to levy substantial fines against companies that market violent or "mature" products d

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

The parents of a six-year old girl killed when Jessy Joe Roten, a Neo-Nazi skinhead, fired an assault rifle into their home, are suing those they claim could have prevented the killing. Ashley Mance was killed when a bullet came through a window, striking her, her twin sister, Aleesha, and wounding her half-sister, Jai

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

Three students were arrested recently after police discovered a plan to carryout a "Columbine style attack" on a Fort Collins, Colorado school. The students wanted the attack to occur on the second anniversary of the Columbine massacre in which two gunmen killed thirteen at the Littleton, Colorado high school. Two

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

There was an explosion at Tampa's Jefferson High School recently. The small blast sent students running for cover. There were no serious injuries. Tampa police arrested three 15 year old students and charged them with arson and throwing a destructive device. Jefferson High, like hundreds of other schools around the

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

U.S. Surgeon General Dr. David Satcher recently issued a report detailing the youth violence epidemic in this country. Satcher reported that while the use of guns appears to be down, physical violence remains at an all time high, almost 70% higher than in 1983. He called for educational programs for families and teac

Posted by Staff Writer
May 25, 2001 12:00 AM

A 17-year-old former Meadowlawn Middle School student was arrested today after another student reported that the boy was carrying a gun on the Meadowlawn campus. A school resource officer arrested the boy and confiscated the .22-caliber sawed off handgun. The former student is said to be developmentally disabled and

Posted by Staff Writer
May 24, 2001 12:00 AM

An 80-year-old California grandmother won her lawsuit against the City of Burbank for her injuries arising from a fall on a city sidewalk. Gladys Dantagnon fell when she stepped in a dip in the sidewalk. She broke her right shoulder, a rib and her right middle finger and sued the city for $85,000, the majority of whi

Posted by Staff Writer
May 24, 2001 12:00 AM

The City of Kissimmee suspended a city traffic supervisor for failing to repair crosswalk signals on Poinciana Boulevard, a busy thoroughfare in the tourist-filled area. Records show that the supervisor knew the batteries were missing in the signals but did not order the necessary repairs. According to the Florid

Posted by Staff Writer
May 24, 2001 12:00 AM

A recent Danish study reported that children in daycare are twice as likely to be prescribed antibiotics as their stay-at-home counterparts. Parents of children who attend daycare are concerned about staying home from work to care for their sick children and, therefore, are more likely to ask for antibiotics to shorte

Posted by Staff Writer
May 24, 2001 12:00 AM

California is shutting down a group home for mentally troubled children because of alleged sexual abuse of residents by their counselors. However, three other group homes run by the same company, Victor Treatment Centers, will not close despite similar reports of sexual abuse. There are at least nine reports of tee

Posted by Staff Writer
May 24, 2001 12:00 AM

The results of a federally-funded study were recently announced by the Society for Research in Child Development. The results indicate that the more time children spend in daycare, the more aggressive they are by the time they reach kindergarten. The study included over 1,300 children from many different settings rangi

Posted by Staff Writer
May 24, 2001 12:00 AM

A study in the April issue of the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine reveals that children in daycare are sick more often than their stay-at-home counterparts. However, the report also indicates that such illnesses do not affect any other areas of child development. The study followed about 1,200 child

Posted by Staff Writer
May 24, 2001 12:00 AM

A Massachusetts family of a boy duct-taped to a wall in his daycare center is suing the owner of the daycare and its employees. The parents, joined by two other families, are suing the daycare, A Place to Grow, Inc., and its employees because of a pattern of abuse. The families claim that the daycare center exposed th

Posted by Staff Writer
May 24, 2001 12:00 AM

Pinellas County, Florida is losing quality family daycare providers because of strict local government regulations on the number of children they can care for. Pinellas County has the strictest limitations in the state on family daycare providers, which are private centers run in individual's homes. Recently, abo

Posted by Staff Writer
May 24, 2001 12:00 AM

A lawsuit filed against a group home for mentally troubled children is in the hands of the jury. The victim is seeking $2.5 million in damages. Nine teenagers claim they were raped and/or molested while residing in one of San Bernadino County's group homes for troubled children. These group facilities are classified

Posted by Staff Writer
May 24, 2001 12:00 AM

Drug manufacturers responsible for over-the-counter medications containing PPA are preparing for the onset of lawsuits related to the Food & Drug Administration's recent announcement that PPA is linked to hemorrhagic strokes. The nation's leading drug manufacturers, including such companies as American Home Product

Posted by Staff Writer
May 24, 2001 12:00 AM

The parents of a small boy who died from a stroke after taking Dimetapp, and a young woman who suffered a debilitating stroke the day after taking the medication, have each filed lawsuits against American Home Products Corp., the maker of the over-the-counter cold drug. Each suit is seeking approximately $40 million i

Posted by Staff Writer
May 23, 2001 12:00 AM

Federal-Mogul Corporation, once a major manufacturer of asbestos laden products, has vowed to fight plaintiff lawyers who are attempting to secure fair compensation for people exposed to Federal-Mogul's products. The company says that it has obtained a credit line for over $550 million to fight the asbestos lawsuits.

Posted by Staff Writer
May 23, 2001 12:00 AM

Recently, researchers became concerned with asbestos fibers contained in some forms of talc. The researchers feel that there may be some health risks to workers involved in talc mining and milling operations. Studies of workers in these industries have found a higher incidence of certain types of tumors. The Federal

Posted by Staff Writer
May 23, 2001 12:00 AM

After 100 years of supplying Ford Motor Company with tires, Bridgestone/Firestone's CEO announced that the company is terminating its relationship with Ford. This action comes in the aftermath of last year's recall involving 6,000,000 Firestone tires and the announcement that Ford is recalling 47,000 of its 2002 Explo

Posted by Staff Writer
May 23, 2001 12:00 AM

The family of a seven-year-old boy killed while participating in an after-school program has filed a wrongful-death claim against the Los Angeles Unified School District. Steve Silva was killed September 15, 2000 when the utility cart he was playing on with his friends rolled down an incline, pinning him against a wal

Posted by Staff Writer
May 23, 2001 12:00 AM

Two years after filing suit against the city of Orlando, James and Susan Gober settled the claim revolving around a faulty sewer line under their former home. The Boyleston Street home's sewer line runs directly underneath the house. The Gobers claim it was frequently out of service, causing their toilets and bathtub

Posted by Staff Writer
May 22, 2001 12:00 AM

Researchers have discovered that those over 80 do not, as a group, have a more difficult time recovering from hip or knee replacement surgery than younger patients. The study found that age alone should not be the deciding factor in determining who should undergo hip or knee replacement surgery. Researchers examined

Posted by Staff Writer
May 22, 2001 12:00 AM

Swiss medical group Sulzer Medica announced that it may not be sufficiently insured to cover the cost of revision surgeries required as part of the recall of the Sulzer Inter-Op artificial-hip joints. To date, the company has reimbursed patients for over 1,700 revision surgeries. Sulzer Medica, recalled its Inter

Posted by Staff Writer
May 22, 2001 12:00 AM

Hip replacement patients like Rhonda Silva of California are frustrated and frightened by the prospect of undergoing further surgery on their ailing hips. Silva, who suffers from osteoporosis and received a Sulzer Orthopedic Hip Replacement in April of 2000, is facing new surgery after her original Sulzer Hip failed.

Posted by Staff Writer
May 22, 2001 12:00 AM

In mid-January 2001, the fourth, of what are likely to be many defective product lawsuits, was filed against Sulzer Orthopedics. The plaintiff, Kelly Hicks, alleges that the Sulzer Artificial Hip Replacement is unreasonably dangerous and has caused her extreme pain and inconvenience. Hicks, 42, is seeking $3 million

Posted by Staff Writer
May 22, 2001 12:00 AM

Today, a jury in Denver ordered that city to pay the family of a college student who was killed when her vehicle collided with a speeding police car. The jury ordered the city to pay the girl's family $2.25 million to compensate them for the loss of their daughter. The accident occurred in 1989 when a Denver police o

Posted by Staff Writer
May 22, 2001 12:00 AM

Both the Federal and state governments heavily regulate nursing homes and similar assisted living facilities . In spite of this oversight, many facilities still provide inadequate care for residents. Nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home healthcare agencies are handling increasingly more complex care s

Posted by Staff Writer
May 22, 2001 12:00 AM

The escalator in the lobby of the Fountain Bleu Hotel in Miami Beach caught an eight year-old boy by surprise when it sucked in the tip of his shoe. Fortunately for him, a film crew shooting in the hotel heard the boy's screams. A hotel employee stopped the escalator by hitting the emergency button and several film cr

Posted by Staff Writer
May 22, 2001 12:00 AM

The family of a four-year-old boy injured while on the Roger Rabbit Car Toon Spin at Disneyland has sued the park for damages arising from the September 22, 2000 accident. The lawsuit alleges that Disneyland was, among other things, negligent in its operation of the ride, and as a consequence, four year-old Brandon Zu

Posted by Staff Writer
May 21, 2001 12:00 AM

In January 1999, Boston Scientific Corporation recalled the ProteGen Vaginal Sling due to an alarming number of complications associated with the device. The ProteGen Vaginal Sling was developed to treat patients who suffer from urinary stress incontinence. Urologists implant the device under the bladder. Unfortu

Posted by Staff Writer
May 21, 2001 12:00 AM

Despite the fact that vaccines exist to prevent many illnesses, almost 70,000 adult men and women in the United States die each year because they do not receive the appropriate vaccinations. According to the Institute of Medicine, many of these people come from lower socio-economic communities. Government offici

Posted by Staff Writer
May 21, 2001 12:00 AM

Most children receive proper vaccinations according to the latest study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Immunization Program. In the report, published in April 2001's "American Journal of Preventative Medicine," researchers found that 73% of all children had received the recommended vacc

Posted by Staff Writer
May 21, 2001 12:00 AM

The pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline has received many complaints regarding its Lyme disease vaccine Lymerix. Many patients who have taken the vaccine claim that they were not made aware of possible side effects, including rare cases of arthritis. Lymerix was introduced in 1998 and is the only vaccine of its

Posted by Staff Writer
May 21, 2001 12:00 AM

GlaxoSmithKline, the manufacturer of LYMErix, insists that the vaccine does not cause arthritis. However, many consumers who took the vaccine tend to disagree. GlaxoSmithKline developed LYMErix to prevent the tick-borne illness Lyme disease. The Food & Drug Administration approved LYMErix in 1999. Since its introduc

Posted by Staff Writer
May 21, 2001 12:00 AM

Over the last decade, Lyme disease has been on the rise, particularly in Connecticut, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. These states account for 90% of all Lyme disease cases. Lyme disease was first discovered in Lyme, Connecticut in 1975. In 1998, t

Posted by Staff Writer
May 21, 2001 12:00 AM

In a study published in the February 22, 2001 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, investigators found that RotaShield caused at least 74 cases of intussusception. RotaShield was developed as a vaccine to protect infants from rotavirus. Almost all of the 74 infants experienced intussusception shortly after r

Posted by Staff Writer
May 21, 2001 12:00 AM

The three-dose oral vaccine RotaShield, manufactured by a division of American Home Products, was removed from the market after questions of infant safety were raised. The Food and Drug Administration approved RotaShield in 1998 to help infants avoid rotavirus. Between 1998 and July 2000 the FDA received fifteen repo

Posted by Staff Writer
May 21, 2001 12:00 AM

According to a new report, the Food and Drug Administration plans to actively encourage hospitals and other healthcare facilities to report deaths and injuries associated with medical devices. Currently, reports made by hospitals, nursing homes, outpatient surgery and medical care centers and dialysis centers only acc

Posted by Staff Writer
May 21, 2001 12:00 AM

According to a new study from Canada, older patients may benefit more from joint replacement than previously thought. Typically, hip and knee replacements are not performed in patients over a certain age, however, the new study suggests that patients well into their 80's may significantly benefit from such procedures.

Posted by Staff Writer
May 20, 2001 12:00 AM

Researchers from Lund University in Sweden have recently discovered molecules that could prevent brain damage that often occurs with strokes. Scientists have discovered a protein in mice called plasma fibronectin that actually guards brain cells during an ischemic stroke. When an ischemic stroke occurs, the brain doe

Posted by Staff Writer
May 20, 2001 12:00 AM

TPA, a drug used to break up clots in stroke victims, can be a wonderful, life-saving treatment, but it should be used with caution. In fact, two new studies point out that only those doctors who are most skilled in administering TPA should do so. TPA is a complex drug that must be given to stroke victims within three

Posted by Staff Writer
May 20, 2001 12:00 AM

Telemedicine is becoming increasingly popular in the United States, and one of the newest forms of this technology can be found in ambulances. Having diagnostic-quality video images, monitors, video cameras, and cell phones connected from the ambulance to the hospital may save many lives, especially those of stroke vi

Posted by Staff Writer
May 20, 2001 12:00 AM

According to a recent Gallup poll, 17 percent of Americans over the age of 50 cannot identify the symptoms of a stroke. This is disturbing news, as failing to recognize stroke symptoms can delay important treatments and lead to permanent damage. The symptoms of stroke include, but are not limited to, numbness or weakn

Posted by Staff Writer
May 20, 2001 12:00 AM

Propulsid, a heartburn drug manufactured by Janssen Pharmaceutica, a Johnson & Johnson Co. subsidiary, is now banned. The removal of Propulsid came too late for many patients and unfortunately many of those who died were children. Propulsid, approved in 1993 and withdrawn from the market in July 2000, was shown to inc

Posted by Staff Writer
May 20, 2001 12:00 AM

Italian doctors are still prescribing Propulsid, even though warning labels state that the drug may be extremely dangerous for many patients. In June 1998, the makers of Propulsid, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, a Johnson & Johnson subsidiary, placed new warning labels on the drug, notifying doctors and patients of potentia

Posted by Staff Writer
May 20, 2001 12:00 AM

Many drug makers utilize warning labels to inform doctors about the possibility of dangerous side effects and drug interactions. Critics of this practice note that many warnings are buried deep within the so-called "package insert" and often come in very small print. These critics further claim that today's increasin

Posted by Staff Writer
May 20, 2001 12:00 AM

The Food & Drug Administration (FDA) considers irritable bowel syndrome to be a "serious" condition. As such, any drug proposed to treat irritable bowel syndrome may undergo an expedited review by the FDA. It is this faster than normal review process that critics say caused FDA investigators to dismiss troubling warn

Posted by Staff Writer
May 20, 2001 12:00 AM

For many women suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), the approval of Lotronex in February 2000 was a blessing. However, the drug was pulled from the market less than six months after it was approved. This was because many patients using Lotronex were diagnosed with ischemic colitis and severe constipation.

Posted by Staff Writer
May 20, 2001 12:00 AM

It took less than 12 months for a promising new drug designed to fight irritable bowel syndrome to be removed from the market due to safety concerns. Lotronex, approved by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) in February 2000, was pulled from the market today due to an alarming number of serious side effects, includin

Posted by Staff Writer
May 20, 2001 12:00 AM

Despite the fact that GlaxoSmithKline was forced to remove Lotronex from the market due to serious and possibly deadly side effects, many consumers who used the product have written the Food and Drug Administration asking that Lotronex be brought back. Lotronex, a medicine prescribed to treat Irritable Bowel Syndrome,

Posted by Staff Writer
May 20, 2001 12:00 AM

Duract, a popular painkilling medication manufactured by Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, poses a serious threat to liver function. While Food & Drug Administration researchers investigating whether to approve new drugs always consider the proposed drug's effect on the liver, Duract's negative impact on the liver was clearl

Posted by Staff Writer
May 20, 2001 12:00 AM

OxyContin sales over the past four years have surpassed $1 billion dollars. Now, the Food and Drug Administration is concerned about OxyContin abuse by the public. The FDA believes that OxyContin is more abused than any drug released in the past twenty years. OxyContin, which is manufactured by Purdue Pharma, is

Posted by Staff Writer
May 20, 2001 12:00 AM

In March of 2001, the makers of the drug OxyContin, Purdue Pharma of Stamford Connecticut, met with the Federal government to discuss the recent surge of problems associated with the drug. OxyContin, which was supposed to help cancer patients and others suffering from severe pain, has found its way into the hands of ab

Posted by Staff Writer
May 20, 2001 12:00 AM

Healthcare professionals are concerned about the enormous increase in prescription pain killer abuse in the United States. The National Institute on Drug Abuse believes that almost four million Americans are abusing prescription drugs. Drugs such as Oxycontin, Xanax, Vicodin, and Valium are abused by millions of older

Posted by Staff Writer
May 19, 2001 12:00 AM

Scientists are very worried about the possibility of a new influenza pandemic. It is believed by many medical health professionals that an influenza epidemic will return and infect not just the United States, but the rest of the world, as well. Much like the Spanish flu in 1918 that killed 40 million people worldwide,

Posted by Staff Writer
May 19, 2001 12:00 AM

According to studies conducted in Japan, vaccinating school-age children protects the elderly from influenza. School-age children make up the largest group of people that spread the disease. During the mid-1970s to the 1980s, the Japanese government vaccinated all children in school. During this period, the death ra

Posted by Staff Writer
May 19, 2001 12:00 AM

By the end of 2002, Bayer AG of Germany plans to introduce its version of Viagra called Vardenafil. Bayer claims that this drug will be a safer and more tolerable alternative to Viagra. Currently in phase III of clinical trials, Vardenafil is being tested on 3,000 men. In phase II, Vardenafil was tested on 600 men in

Posted by Staff Writer
May 19, 2001 12:00 AM

Doctors in Hong Kong are becoming increasingly aware of the black market availability for Viagra. These doctors warn of the dangers of buying the drug from black market buyers, explaining that impotence is often a sign that some other medical condition exists. Without a proper exam from a doctor, many patients will n

Posted by Staff Writer
May 19, 2001 12:00 AM

Three new studies on Pfizer's wonder drug Viagra show that men who have heart conditions may still use the medication. After the Food and Drug Administration approved Viagra in 1998, it received several reports that men who used the drug had experienced heart attacks. Cardiologists believed that this was due to the f

Posted by Staff Writer
May 19, 2001 12:00 AM

Viagra has had much success since its arrival into the medical marketplace three years ago. Many men have found that Viagra gives their sexual relationship the added boost that it was previously missing. Some women, however, are complaining about the drug. These women see Viagra as the catalyst for their husbands' af

Posted by Staff Writer
May 19, 2001 12:00 AM

According to The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 20,000 Americans die each year from influenza and another 110,000 people are hospitalized for the illness. Previous studies have shown that the flu vaccine can be very beneficial to patients in prevention of the illness. A new study that targets elderly

Posted by Staff Writer
May 19, 2001 12:00 AM

Relenza (zanamivir), an anti-influenza product delivered through an inhaler, has been reported to be difficult to use by the elderly population. The maker of Relenza, Glaxosmithkline PLC, recently reported that many of the elderly patients who attempt to use the inhaler are unable to do so. Dr. Paul Diggory, on s

Posted by Staff Writer
May 19, 2001 12:00 AM

Doctors were pleased with the decrease in the number of influenza cases this year, which dropped from 5.6% last year to 4.1% percent this year. The flu can be a very serious illness, killing almost 20,000 Americans and hospitalizing 114,000 people each year. Symptoms may include respiratory inflammation, fever, muscu

Posted by Staff Writer
May 18, 2001 12:00 AM

Zyban, manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline, has been prescribed to over 15 million people worldwide since winning approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2000. The medication reduces the craving for nicotine that tobacco products produce. For patients in Britain, Zyban has been marketed as the first a

Posted by Staff Writer
May 18, 2001 12:00 AM

According to GlaxoSmithKline and the UK Department of Health, at present there is no link between reports of 18 deaths and the use of Zyban. "The contribution of Zyban to these deaths is unknown," commented the department. After the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Zyban in July 2000, several British genera

Posted by Staff Writer
May 18, 2001 12:00 AM

Despite the fact that Ephedra may pose serious health risks, the dietary supplement is experiencing tremendous success. Ephedra, also known as Ma Huang, is an herbal supplement originally sold in small health food stores. Today, however, Ephedra can be found in larger stores including Wal-Mart. Because it is conside

Posted by Staff Writer
May 18, 2001 12:00 AM

Ephedra may cause serious side effects including heart palpitations, strokes, and even death. Ephedra can be found in several over-the-counter weight loss stimulants, typically sold in local health food and herbal supplement stores. After receiving over 270 reports of serious side effects, the Food and Drug Administr

Posted by Staff Writer
May 18, 2001 12:00 AM

A study conducted by scientists at the University of California, San Francisco shows that the dietary supplement Ephedra may pose serious health risks for its users. The study, which was scheduled to appear in the December 21st 2000 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, was actually published earlier at the r

Posted by Staff Writer
May 18, 2001 12:00 AM

An Alaska jury awarded a women over $13 million after she suffered a near fatal stroke caused by a diet supplement containing ephedrine. In one of the first suits regarding ephedrine to see the inside of a courtroom, the judge ordered E'Ola International of St. George, Utah to compensate the woman. The company's AMP

Posted by Staff Writer
May 17, 2001 12:00 AM

Fluoroquinolones are one of the most important and popular classes of antibiotics used to treat many types of infections in humans. Baytril, a fluoroquinolone recently approved for use in cattle and poultry, may be responsible for increasing human resistance to fluoroquinolones, thus reducing their ability to fight in

Posted by Staff Writer
May 17, 2001 12:00 AM

Acute sinusitis is the inflammation of the membranes lining the sinuses. Almost 20 million Americans have experienced acute sinusitis, and it is one of the most common ailments in children. Many children are treated with antibiotics for acute sinusitis; however, most acute sinusitis infections are caused by viruses.

Posted by Staff Writer
May 17, 2001 12:00 AM

Merck's Vioxx and Pharmacia Corp.'s Celebrex may become even more popular if an FDA advisory panel endorses claims that the two drugs are safer than already existing arthritis drugs. Sales of Vioxx and Celebrex , known as COX-2 inhibitors, could increase if the Food and Drug Administration finds them to be safer

Posted by Staff Writer
May 17, 2001 12:00 AM

Pharmaceutical companies are responsible for some of the greatest advances in modern healthcare; however, there is a growing side effect associated with the business, lawsuits. Many once promising wonder drugs have become the target of criticism and personal injury suits after they caused more harm than good. Case in

Posted by Staff Writer
May 17, 2001 12:00 AM

American Home Products Corporation, the giant pharmaceutical company that manufactured the drugs used in the now infamous fen-phen diet drug cocktail, announced today that it is setting aside an additional $7.5 billion to compensate those injured by fen-phen. The company's reserves for such litigation now total over $

Posted by Staff Writer
May 17, 2001 12:00 AM

Penny Luckel from Jackson, Mississippi is now several million dollars richer after her lawyers settled her case against American Home Products (AHP). Luckel, who took American Home Products' drug combination fen-phen, suffered from leaky heart valves and was forced to undergo open-heart surgery to correct the problem.

Posted by Staff Writer
May 17, 2001 12:00 AM

For many years, the American public has relied on American Home Products (AHP) to provide consumers with quality items such as Preparation H and Advil. Recently, however, American Home Products has had several lawsuits to handle in addition to running its business. One of the largest lawsuits surrounds the drugs Redu

Posted by Staff Writer
May 16, 2001 12:00 AM

Diabetic retinopathy, a condition that can cause blindness, is on the rise. This may be because many diabetics do not get the proper treatment for their illness and need more education about the possible damage that diabetes can do to the eyes. Diabetic retinopathy is caused when high sugar levels damage the blood v

Posted by Staff Writer
May 16, 2001 12:00 AM

Rezulin, Warner-Lambert's drug for Type II diabetes, was first submitted to the FDA for review in 1996. Certain FDA investigators, including Dr. John L. Gueriguian, questioned Rezulin's effectiveness in controlling blood sugar levels. However, more troubling to Dr. Gueriguian were the deadly side effects that the dru

Posted by Staff Writer
May 16, 2001 12:00 AM

During the FDA clinical trials of Warner Lambert's proposed diabetes drug Rezulin, a senior FDA researcher raised questions about the drug's safety. He was fired shortly thereafter, and a Warner Lambert official characterized the firing as the removal of a "hurdle" to Rezulin's approval. The Los Angeles Times obtaine

Posted by Staff Writer
May 16, 2001 12:00 AM

According to weight loss experts, diet pills containing Chitosan simply do not work. Chitosan is derived from shellfish and is said to absorb fat before the body can, making fat intake virtually impossible. Although some initial studies found that Chitosan might be able to live up to its claims, it was later determin

Posted by Staff Writer
May 16, 2001 12:00 AM

The United States Surgeon General's office recently released a "Report on Physical Activity and Health." The report revealed that Americans are living more sedentary lives, thus creating physical and health risks. More than 60% of adults do not complete the recommended amount of physical activity, another 25% are not

Posted by Staff Writer
May 16, 2001 12:00 AM

Zyban, manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline, has been taken by hundreds of thousands of people as an aid to help them stop smoking. Research indicates that one-third of all Zyban users quit smoking for more than a year. As such, Zyban appears to be twice as effective as nicotine patches. Despite this, some Zyban patient

Posted by Staff Writer
May 16, 2001 12:00 AM

Angioplasty is often performed on patients as an alternative to bypass surgery, but new research shows that this procedure is not a good choice for all patients. This is especially true for diabetics. In fact, many diabetics who have angioplasty experience a high occurrence of clogging after the procedure, thus incre

Posted by Staff Writer
May 16, 2001 12:00 AM

New reports from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that measuring waist circumference and body mass in patients may be a quick and easy way to determine whether or not a patient has a serious disease, such as type 2 Diabetes. According to the report, it is important to identify heal

Posted by Staff Writer
May 15, 2001 12:00 AM

The European Medicines Evaluation Agency (EMEA) reported recently that an alarming number of people who take the arthritis drug Arava are becoming afflicted with various liver maladies. The EMEA cited 296 cases of adverse liver reactions in Arava patients. Arava, also known as leflunomide, is manufactured by Aventis

Posted by Staff Writer
May 15, 2001 12:00 AM

Even faced with the knowledge that a new drug used to fight high blood pressure could cause serious heart arrhythmias and even death, the FDA chose to approve Hoffman-La Roche Inc.'s Posicor. According to FDA officials, during clinical trials of Posicor a 70-year-old man died suddenly after taking the drug. Posicor "

Posted by Staff Writer
May 15, 2001 12:00 AM

Women who take a warfarin anticoagulant and use a miconazole intravaginal cream or suppository may be at risk for developing an increased prothrombin time, international normalized ratio (INR) and bleeding, according to the Food and Drug Administration. Due to this new information, any vaginal antifungal product conta

Posted by Staff Writer
May 15, 2001 12:00 AM

After several students at Murray Middle School got sick, it became apparent that they had all taken large doses of an over-the-counter cold medicine. While the details are not yet known, it is believed that one or two students brought the pills to school and then distributed them to at least seven other students.

Posted by Staff Writer
May 15, 2001 12:00 AM

CVS and its on-line pharmacy announced that it is pulling all cold and diet products that contain phenylpropanolamine or PPA. The FDA has found that PPA is associated with an increased occurrence of strokes in young women. The FDA also feels that PPA is not safe for men. CVS urges its customers to visit their health

Posted by Staff Writer
May 15, 2001 12:00 AM

Many doctors are recommending that their patients avoid cold medications and appetite suppressants that contain phenylpropanolamine, more commonly known as PPA. "There are safer alternatives out there, so why take the risk?" asked Dr. Ray Woosley, chairman of the pharmacology department at Georgetown University Medica

Posted by Staff Writer
May 15, 2001 12:00 AM

Pharmaceutical companies spend billions of dollars each year in an effort to find novel drug therapies and bring them to market before the competition does. While this massive financial effort has lead to many great scientific breakthroughs, it has also depleted companies' funds for post-approval monitoring of these n

Posted by Staff Writer
May 15, 2001 12:00 AM

On November 6, the Food and Drug Administration issued a public health advisory alerting consumers to stop using over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription drug products containing phenylpropanolamine (PPA) because this ingredient has been associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (bleeding in the brain).

Posted by Staff Writer
May 15, 2001 12:00 AM

On October 19, 2000 an FDA advisory committee issued a warning about an ingredient contained in many popular over-the-counter and prescription cold and weight loss medicines. The committee said that phenylpropanolamine, also known as PPA, may be responsible for hundreds of strokes in otherwise healthy people under the

Posted by Staff Writer
May 15, 2001 12:00 AM

Patients suffering from fibromyalgia may find an added benefit from taking an antidepressant. According to an analysis of 10 reports by P.G. O'Malley and colleagues, antidepressants may relieve pain, fatigue, and insomnia in some fibroyalgia patients. Fibroyalgia is a condition causing patients tenderness in at le

Posted by Staff Writer
May 15, 2001 12:00 AM

American men and women who suffer from depression or anxiety have begun looking for alternative forms of treatment. This information comes from a new Harvard University survey. According to the survey, over half of those polled are currently using something other than traditional forms of treatment, including visitin

Posted by Staff Writer
May 15, 2001 12:00 AM

Unfortunately, according to the United States Surgeon General, almost twenty-five percent of those who suffer from mental illness go untreated. The report found that roughly one in five Americans experiences some type of mental disorder. The report further commented that, "Critical gaps exist between those who need s

Posted by Staff Writer
May 15, 2001 12:00 AM

Schizophrenia, a neuropsychiatric disorder that affects almost one in every one hundred people in America, is the subject of much research. Doctors and scientists are anxious to discover what causes the disease and how to stop it. A new study from Johns Hopkins Children's Center states that a virus may play a part in

Posted by Staff Writer
May 15, 2001 12:00 AM

Schizophrenics have a new choice for medication, thanks to the Food and Drug Administration's approval of Geodon. Schizophrenia is a complicated disorder that causes delusions, hallucinations and strange thinking patterns, all of which result in the schizophrenic's withdrawal from society. According to critics,

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

Drug court is an excellent option for those persons who are addicted to drugs and are currently facing jail time. It has changed the lives of many of its attendees. This intense program requires its members to follow directions and strict guidelines. Many people who opt for this program find it incredibly diffi

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

The European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EAEM) recently announced that the drug Orlaam may be responsible for 10 new cases of life threatening heart rhythm disorders. These 10 cases all involved young patients who were taking Orlaam to treat their addictions to heroin. Due to this new informat

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

Janssen Pharmaceutica has decided to discontinue its sales of the prescription antihistamine Hismanal due to the fact that the allergy marketplace is overly saturated with other antihistamine products. Sales have been on a steady decrease since the announcement that Hismanal has the potential for serious side effects.

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

Fentanyl, a drug that is most often used for labor pain, is in very short supply. Anesthesiologists are concerned about the shortage, stating that they must use morphine or Demerol instead. These two drugs are effective alternatives; however, they are not the doctors' first choice. Fentanyl is used as an epidura

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

According to a new report from Australian researchers, women are less affected by anesthesia but more susceptible to the side affects associated with the drug anesthetics. This information comes from interviews where it was discovered after surveys were taken of 463 men and women who underwent elective procedures such

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

The anesthetic drug Propofol (Diprivan) may cause heart attacks in those patients suffering from head trauma and subsequently on ventilation in an Intensive Care Unit. This information comes from the researchers of the University Medical Centre Utrecht, in the Netherlands. This possibility became apparent after five

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

The manufacturer of the drug Raplon voluntarily recently removed the muscle relaxant from the market after it learned of five deaths related to its use. Doctors often use a muscle relaxant such as Raplon when inserting a breathing tube in patients. Raplon was a good choice for surgeons because the drug's effectiveness

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

The anesthesia drug, Raplon, manufactured by Organon Pharmaceuticals, was voluntarily removed from the market after it was linked to five patient deaths and many more cases of serious side effects over the last several months. Raplon, which was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in August of 1999, was created

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

Antibiotic drug resistance is growing and Stuart Levy, the president of the Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics, claims that "lack of awareness at all levels . . . has contributed to the problem." In order to fight this problem, several Federal government agencies have come together and written a comprehensive

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

Doctors are more aware than ever of the need to only prescribe antibiotics when absolutely necessary. Despite what most people believe, antibiotics are useless against any type of viral infection, including colds, influenza, and most sore throats. Doctors are well aware of the need to prescribe fewer antibiotics

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

Patients who want antibiotics to treat colds and respiratory infections need to have a better understanding of the cause of their ailments. Recently, there has been a tremendous increase in antibiotic-resistant infections. This resistance can be traced to the overuse of prescription antibiotics. Often, patients d

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

Glaxo Wellcome's antibiotic Raxar was approved in November 1997, despite the FDA's concerns that Raxar could cause potentially deadly heart rhythm problems. FDA researchers were particularly concerned with two patients who had died while participating in clinical trials of Raxar. Dr. Andrea N. Meyerhoff, a researcher

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

Pfizer Pharmaceutical's 1996 drug experiment investigating the effectiveness of its new antibiotic Trovan on sick Nigerian children may not have received appropriate approvals by Nigerian medical officials. A Nigerian doctor in charge of the Trovan drug trial recently admitted that he backdated government approvals in

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

Pfizer officials vowed to get to the bottom of allegations that the company's experimental use of the antibiotic Trovan in Nigeria was improper. In 1996 Pfizer conducted a clinical trial of Trovan during a meningitis outbreak in the African country. Recently, Nigerian officials disclosed that a key component of P

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

In 1999 Rosemary Porta, a Pennsylvania librarian, visited her local doctor complaining of chest congestion. Her doctor, realizing that Ms. Porta was allergic to the popular antibiotic amoxicillin, gave her a new antibiotic called Trovan. Manufactured by Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, Trovan was a powerful new drug in the qu

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

The Food and Drug Administration has issued a new warning to women who are simultaneously taking the blood thinner warfarin and the over-the-counter vaginal cream miconazole (an ingredient in Monistat and other feminine products). The FDA suggests that these patients consult with their doctors before using the vaginal

Posted by Staff Writer
May 14, 2001 12:00 AM

Women who use Monistat or one of 10 other generic vaginal creams and suppositories should be aware of the possible drug interaction with Coumadin, a prescription blood thinner. Monistat and some other nonprescription vaginal creams contain the anti-fungal drug miconazole, which has been found to cause bleeding in some

Posted by Staff Writer
May 13, 2001 12:00 AM

Aetna is considering settling the massive class action lawsuit filed against it alleging fraud and racketeering. Aetna patients sued the giant HMO in an attempt to force the company to stop offering its doctors incentives to limit patient care. The class action lawsuit also seeks to limit the industry practice of c

Posted by Staff Writer
May 13, 2001 12:00 AM

Health insurers and HMOs are notorious for their stall tactics when it comes to paying for doctor visits and medical procedures. Just ask Washington, D.C. resident John Smith who realized that several of his claims had either been delayed or completely ignored by his insurer. When performing an end of the year review

Posted by Staff Writer
May 13, 2001 12:00 AM

The United States Supreme Court has agreed to hear arguments in two cases that may determine whether patients can continue to enjoy third party review of HMO coverage denials. At present 37 states have laws that allow patients to challenge their HMO's denial of medical coverage. However, several HMOs claim that the l

Posted by Staff Writer
May 13, 2001 12:00 AM

In an investigation conducted by the Chicago Tribune, researchers found that under trained and overworked nurses abound in the U.S. healthcare system. It comes then as no surprise that serious medical errors committed by these nurses are occurring with increasing frequency. The investigation found that since 1995 at

Posted by Staff Writer
May 13, 2001 12:00 AM

It is a good time to graduate from nursing school. Hospitals and doctors' offices are aggressively competing for registered nurses with some offering signing bonuses, child care and other perks. The low supply of nurses is occurring as demand for their services is reaching an all time high. With the 78 million baby

Posted by Staff Writer
May 13, 2001 12:00 AM

With an increasing number of school children suffering from medical ailments, school nurses are dispensing more and more drugs. A nationwide survey of school nurses revealed that at least half had made medication errors over the past year. The nursing errors in administering medication included missed doses, overdose

Posted by Staff Writer
May 13, 2001 12:00 AM

A study issued by a national pharmacist association reports that over 50% of Americans are taking at least two prescription medications daily with many supplementing these with vitamins and minerals. As such, the report commissioned by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) warns that patients need t

Posted by Staff Writer
May 13, 2001 12:00 AM

A New York court has ruled that pharmacies owe patrons a fiduciary duty of confidentiality with respect to prescriptions records. This ruling comes after a man with AIDS, who claims to represent a group of New York citizens, decided to sue CVS Corp. and a pharmacy that sold his prescription records to CVS in 1999.

Posted by Staff Writer
May 13, 2001 12:00 AM

When you take a new prescription home from the pharmacy, do you really know what is in the bottle, how to use it, and possible dangerous side effects? While most prescription bottles contain information relating to the appropriate dose, few patients actually ask for and receive the so-called "package insert." The pac

Posted by Staff Writer
May 13, 2001 12:00 AM

Public Citizen, the consumer group founded by advocate Ralph Nadar, called the FDA's role in the drug approval process tainted. Public Citizen director Sidney Wolfe sent a letter to former Secretary of Health & Human Services Donna Shalala yesterday in which he blasted the FDA for intimidating line researchers into ap

Posted by Staff Writer
May 13, 2001 12:00 AM

Although many Americans think that teens are the largest group of acne sufferers, a new study from the American Academy of Dermatology reveals that adult women complain of acne more so than teens. "Seventeen million Americans have acne, and at least half of adult women suffer from some degree of acne ," stated D

Posted by Staff Writer
May 13, 2001 12:00 AM

Despite extensive research on the topic, doctors are still under equipped with medical information concerning the best treatment for acne sufferers. This information comes from a new analysis of over 250 studies of acne treatments. One reason doctors have so little information is because few studies directly com

Posted by Staff Writer
May 13, 2001 12:00 AM

Accutane, Roche Pharmaceutical's acne drug, was first approved by the federal government in 1982. Accutane has proved very effective in treating stubborn forms of acne. However, some Accutane patients are beginning to question the drug's impact on their emotional state. Acne sufferer Lynn Bell has used Accutane thre

Posted by Staff Writer
May 13, 2001 12:00 AM

On December 4, 2000 a congressional hearing was held in Washington, D.C. on the adverse side effects associated with the popular acne drug Accutane. The hearing, titled "Is Teen Acne Drug Linked to Depression and Suicide?" was called by lawmakers who have become concerned over growing reports that Accutane may cause d

Posted by Staff Writer
May 12, 2001 12:00 AM

A study sponsored by the Kaiser Family Foundation and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality found that Americans are more concerned with the possibility that their healthcare provider may make a mistake than they are that the plane they fly in may crash. Over 70% of those surveyed responded that they consider

Posted by Staff Writer
May 12, 2001 12:00 AM

In a report released in the recent issue of "The Oncologist," a medical journal, doctors and other healthcare providers discussed the issue of medical errors and how to better prevent them. Common medical errors include incorrect drug or dosage instructions, procedure-related problems, or diagnostic errors. Doctors a

Posted by Staff Writer
May 12, 2001 12:00 AM

According to a Seattle area study, 10% of minorities experienced some form of discrimination in hospitals, clinics, or doctors' offices. The study revealed that such discrimination tends to discourage minorities from seeking medical attention when they need it most. "We have major, major problems," said King County E

Posted by Staff Writer
May 12, 2001 12:00 AM

The Federal Department of Health and Human Services has compiled a record of problem doctors known as the National Practitioners Data Bank. The data bank is kept secret from the public because the government fears its release could harm many doctors' reputations. According to the report, at least 500 doctors have had

Posted by Staff Writer
May 12, 2001 12:00 AM

A study examining drug errors committed by doctors and other healthcare professionals found that most of the errors are minor and do not threaten the long-term health of the patient. However, many healthcare professionals, including doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and technicians are never informed that they have made a

Posted by Staff Writer
May 12, 2001 12:00 AM

A study conducted by the University of Oklahoma and sponsored by Immunex Corporation is the subject of a lawsuit filed today. The study involved testing the effectiveness of a new vaccine to prevent a certain type of skin cancer. Fourteen patients and their families sued the university and company accusing the study'

Posted by Staff Writer
May 12, 2001 12:00 AM

A study released by Doctor Alejandro C. Arroliga from The Cleveland Clinic Foundation found that one in five patients who die in the ICU have been misdiagnosed by their doctor. The study, published in the medical journal Chest examined the medical records of over 400 ICU patients. Post-death autopsies confirmed that

Posted by Staff Writer
May 12, 2001 12:00 AM

Each year over 20,000 doctors commit medical errors, some intentionally. Public Citizen Health Research Group released the report, "Questionable Doctors," in order to inform the public of the frequency of medical mistakes. "It's worrisome that you can get more information on unsafe cars than unsafe doctors who cause

Posted by Staff Writer
May 12, 2001 12:00 AM

In a trend that may be spreading throughout the country, doctors at New Jersey's JFK Medical Center Hospital have been told to reduce the number of days their patients remain hospitalized or risk losing their permission to practice in the hospital. Critics charge that the hospital is sacrificing patient health for the

Posted by Staff Writer
May 12, 2001 12:00 AM

California's experience with emergency room overcrowding three years ago has spread throughout the rest of the Nation. Ambulances often pass by the nearest hospitals and must travel farther as emergency rooms are increasingly closing their doors to incoming patients. "This is a symptom of an entire health care system

Posted by Staff Writer
May 12, 2001 12:00 AM

A report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association revealed that 4,000 people die because they have surgery in hospitals lacking the appropriate amount of experience. Researchers reviewed records from 1983 to 1998 and compared surgical volume in hospitals to their rates of death. The report found t

Posted by Staff Writer
May 12, 2001 12:00 AM

Hospital security for Jacksonville, Florida's St. Vincent's Medical Center has gotten much tighter after a homeless man was able to pose as a doctor and write a prescription for an emergency patient. Gary Stearley, 27, was able to obtain a hospital badge after telling hospital security that he lost his, and then spe

Posted by Staff Writer
May 12, 2001 12:00 AM

With hospital borne infections increasing at an alarming rate, researchers are calling for an increased emphasis on sanitation. What is their simple recommendation? Doctors, nurses, technicians, assistant, patients and families should wash their hands often. Researchers have discovered that doctors and nurses of

Posted by Staff Writer
May 12, 2001 12:00 AM

The risk of acquiring a serious infection while being treated in a hospital has risen over 35% in the last 20 years. As a result, many people who come into a hospital for treatment of one ailment leave the hospital with another. A study released today found that 2.2 million Americans contract an infection unrelated t

Posted by Staff Writer
May 11, 2001 12:00 AM

Last month, several consumer groups attended a Food and Drug Administration forum on Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE). BSE, commonly referred to as "Mad Cow" disease, is of great concern to these groups. They are asking the FDA to create tighter restrictions on the inspection of livestock and the monitoring of

Posted by Staff Writer
May 11, 2001 12:00 AM

The first official outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in over twenty years has caused the British government to ban all exports of live animals, and fresh meats and milk in February, 2001. In addition, British officials closed down a slaughterhouse in Essex, South England where 27 pigs were found to be contaminated.

Posted by Staff Writer
May 10, 2001 12:00 AM

The families of two men killed in a Ford Explorer rollover on a Texas highway got their day in court on Tuesday. The families accused Ford of designing the Explorer in an "unreasonably unsafe and imminently dangerous [manner]." Ford cites driver negligence as the primary cause of the auto accident and denies that the

Posted by Staff Writer
May 09, 2001 12:00 AM

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is recommending that owners of vehicles with certain models and sizes of Firestone tires not already being recalled by Firestone take a number of actions to assure their safety, based on NHTSA's analysis of Firestone's data. On May 2, 2000, NHTSA opened a d

Posted by Staff Writer
May 09, 2001 12:00 AM

Ford Motor Company, in an effort to put the Explorer - Firestone debacle behind it, is moving aggressively to settle many of the personal injury lawsuits filed against the company. Reports indicate that Ford has settled six such cases today alone. Such a settlement rate is almost unheard of and signals Ford's acknowl

Posted by Staff Writer
May 08, 2001 12:00 AM

According to researchers, people who smoke cigarettes may be more at risk to develop than nonsmokers. These blood clots can block the blood supply and may lead to serious heart conditions, including fatal heart attacks. Smoking cigarettes increases the coagulability of blood. The result is that clots are more likely

Posted by Staff Writer
May 08, 2001 12:00 AM

Ford Motor Company is currently facing personal injury and other lawsuits in which damages could exceed several billion dollars. Ford issued a press release stating that the company is being sued over safety issues, including deaths and injuries related to the Explorer sport utility vehicle. In Ford's most recent

Posted by Staff Writer
May 08, 2001 12:00 AM

The National Highway Transportation Traffic Safety Administration is currently investigating DaimlerChrysler AG minivans after 164 complaints were registered in conjunction with a the faulty clockspring assembly. This assembly is responsible for providing electricity to the driver side airbag for deployment in the eve

Posted by Staff Writer
May 08, 2001 12:00 AM

A jury recently awarded a California man $25.7 million from General Motors, the maker of his Chevy Blazer that buckled during an auto accident, leaving him paralyzed. The Chevy Blazer rolled several times, and despite using a seatbelt, the driver is now a paraplegic with only limited use of his right hand. While t

Posted by Staff Writer
May 07, 2001 12:00 AM

The National Safe Kids Campaign issued its report on child safety regulations today, citing 24 states as failing to pass adequate regulations to protect young automobile passengers. The report coincides with National Child Passenger Safety Week and issues grades ranging from A to F. Only California earned an A. The

Posted by Staff Writer
May 07, 2001 12:00 AM

In an attempt to make the lives of parents easier, many companies have created multi-use children's products, including swings that may be used as high chairs, car seats that are also infant carriers, and carriers that can be used with swings and strollers. Despite the versatility of these products, organizations such

Posted by Staff Writer
May 02, 2001 12:00 AM

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that Toyota is recalling over 53,000 Toyota Camry's due to a possible flaw in the accelerator cable housings. The vehicles subject to the recall were built at a Kentucky assembly plant between 1997 and 2000 and include model years 1998 through 2001. The Camry

Posted by Staff Writer
May 02, 2001 12:00 AM

The Federal government is stepping up its investigation into airbag defects involving 2.8 million DaimlerChrysler minivans. Reports state that airbags installed in the minivans may not deploy in a crash. At least two people have been injured when their airbags failed to deploy. The investigation involves airbags i

Posted by Staff Writer
May 02, 2001 12:00 AM

More than 29 people have suffered severe eye injuries, including blindness, because of deploying passenger side airbags in late model Nissan Altimas. An investigation has been launched in order to determine why such injuries occurred in the 1994 and 1995 model Altimas. There are approximately 325,000 of these models

Posted by Staff Writer
May 02, 2001 12:00 AM

A Miami teen died and his 27-year-old cousin was critically injured when their all-terrain vehicle (ATV) crashed into a wall of rocks and overturned. The two were riding on a four-wheel Yamaha Banshee. Police found the two riders around 8:00 a.m. Sunday sprawled along a five-foot high wall of jagged rocks. Rodriguez

Posted by Staff Writer
May 02, 2001 12:00 AM

A lawsuit has been filed against Kia Motors alleging that defective front brake systems were installed on model year 1998 through model year 2000 Sephia sedans. The faulty brakes caused premature wear requiring expensive repairs. Kia, a unit of Hyundai Motor Co., maintains that Sephia brakes "have always been sa

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Our mission is to seek the complete truth and provide a full and fair account of the events and issues that surround personal safety, accident prevention, and injury recovery.  We are committed to serving the public with honesty and integrity in these efforts.

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